SURGERY DATE: April 6th (FRIDAY)
Complete extraction of my teeth, plus they’re going to fix my face so that all the edema that’s been haunting me since my original surgery will no longer be an issue.
I’ll be toothless for almost a year, and I’ll be following a no-chew diet.
Even if you can’t donate (especially if you can’t donate) PLEASE REBLOG. A dollar is a more than I had before:
Fundraising page is [HERE].
[Shamelessly tagging all the things]

SURGERY DATE: April 6th (FRIDAY)

Complete extraction of my teeth, plus they’re going to fix my face so that all the edema that’s been haunting me since my original surgery will no longer be an issue.

I’ll be toothless for almost a year, and I’ll be following a no-chew diet.

Even if you can’t donate (especially if you can’t donate) PLEASE REBLOG. A dollar is a more than I had before:

Fundraising page is [HERE].


[Shamelessly tagging all the things]

PROJECT NEW TEETH

… is HERE.

Every dollar is a dollar more than I didn’t have before. If you cannot donate, please reblog.

Thank you so much, Tumblrpeeps. You mean the world to me!

10 Things You Need to Know About Young Adults With Cancer

1) CANCER IS KILLING US

Surprise! Cancer is the single most fatal disease for young adults. And, if you leave out the big three — murder, suicide and unintentional injury — cancer is the leading cause of death, period.


2) THERE ARE MORE OF US THAN YOU THINK

Nearly 70,000 young adults between the ages of 15 and 39 in the US alone are diagnosed with cancer every year. That’s close to SEVEN PERCENT of all cancer diagnoses.


3) YOUNG ADULTS ARE THE MOST LIKELY PATIENTS TO HAVE A DELAYED DIAGNOSIS

Between our personal feelings of ‘invincibility’, rare visits to the doctor and low clinical suspicion once we get there, it can take us much longer than other patients to find the doctors we need to help us on the other side of our diagnosis.


4) IT’S A ‘NO-MAN’S LAND’ BETWEEN PEDIATRIC AND ADULT ONCOLOGY

Where SHOULD you go if you’re a 26-year old with Ewing sarcoma or a 17-year old with testicular cancer? We have no medical “home” where both the treatment and the environment are geared to our needs.


5) YOUNG ADULTS ARE THE MOST LIKELY TO BE UNDER- OR UNINSURED.

We’re too old for our parents’ insurance, too young for Medicare, and may not yet be in a jobs with great health benefits. Our income level may pit premiums against minor priorities like… oh, food or rent. And inexperience in the system can cause us to miss available assistance.


6) YOUNG ADULTS ARE THE LEAST REPRESENTED GROUP IN CLINICAL TRIALS

Less than 2% of young adult patients are on clinical trials, and little to no research focuses specifically on us. About 90% of us are treated in the community — AKA: The Land of NO Trials — which doesn’t improve our odds.


7) SURVIVAL RATES IN OUR AGE GROUP HAVE REMAINED NEARLY FLAT FOR 30 YEARS

Kids and older patients have seen steady improvement in the survival rates of the last three decades thanks to advances in treatments, prevention and screening. We haven’t.


8) WHEN WE FINISH TREATMENT, WE STILL HAVE A LONG WAY TO GO

Finishing treatment is like being pushed off a cliff. Without a parachute. We want to be happy and “normal” again, but instead, we may be left facing big question marks: physical or cognitive side effects, fear of recurrence, massive debt and a newly forged, not-quite-stable identity.


9) WE WANT TO TALK ABOUT SEXUALITY AND FERTILITY

We’re forming our sexual self and are in our prime childbearing years, so we need to talk about these issues even if they’re not on our radar yet. Our sexual issues could stem from the disease, treatment, medications, stress or even our healthy partner. The fertility decisions we make now — sometimes with only a small window of opportunity — will affect our family and us for the rest of our lives.


10) OUR SUPPORT NEEDS ARE DIFFERENT FROM OTHER PATIENTS

We don’t fit in with most support groups. We want to know other patients whose happy-hour chatter might consist of how to date while bald and beefed up on ‘roids; whether or not we can have kids; and scheming to stay in school or at work just for the insurance. Oh, and whether we’re going to live or die.



—- Statistics from Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology Progress // PlanetCancer.org  ((These people are amazing))